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PENINSULA MALAYSIA and BORNEO

PENINSULA: 12th - 23rd June 2006

BORNEO: 24th June - 5th July 2006

Leader: Sam Woods

Participants:
FULL TOUR:Tom Ferrier, Fred Ramsey and Lee Ramsey.
BORNEO ONLY: Paul Bristow, Kim Young and John Willis.

All photos in this report were taken on these tours.


Red-bearded Bee-eater, The Gap (Sam Woods)

Malaysia is quite simply the very best of southeast Asian birding - an English-speaking area with superb infrastructure (the Borneo Rainforest Lodge at Danum possibly being the finest lodge in the region), good Asian cuisine and a great set of birds. On this tour we sampled all of this firsthand. When most birders come to Malaysia they think of Pittas, Broadbills, Trogons and other colorful families. That is exactly what we set about seeing, with highlights including arguably the World's best looking bird, a breeding plumage male Banded Pitta on the Peninsula, along with the almost as impressive Garnet Pitta - both in the lowland rainforest of the famous Taman Negara National Park; while the montane areas on the Peninsula, around Fraser's Hill and The Gap, produced Silver-breasted Broadbill, Orange-breasted Trogon, Red-bearded Bee-eater, Slaty-backed Forktail to name a few. Borneo allowed us to see some of the very best of the Peninsula birds again, although also allowed us to add some very special birds to that island. Among these in the lowlands at Danum, included both the lowland endemic Wren-Babblers - Bornean & Black-throated Wren-Babblers both seen well there, along with arguably Borneo's top endemic - the enigmatic Bornean Bristlehead, an endemic species and in its own monotypic family. Whilst in the mountains on Kinabalu highlights included the rare Everett's Thrush, the final endemic Wren-Babbler - Mountain Wren-Babbler and a whole bunch of other endemics including Mountain Black-eye and Golden-naped & Mountain Barbets. Borneo is also a good place for mammals and Danum provided numerous encounters with the amazing Orang-Utan, and other interesting sightings like Slow Loris, Maroon Langur, Flying Lemur and Bornean Gibbons swinging by the lodge every morning.

Itinerary:
12 June ARRIVAL in Kuala Lumpur.
13 June Kuala Lumpur - Kuala Selangor. Afternoon birding Kuala Selangor.
14 June AM Kuala Selangor. PM Kuala Selangor - Fraser's Hill.
15 - 17 June Fraser's Hill and The Gap.
18 June Fraser's Hill - Taman Negara. PM Taman Negara.
19 - 22 June Taman Negara.
23 June Taman Negara - Kuala Lumpur.
24 June Kuala Lumpur - Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Borneo).
25 June Kota Kinabalu - Danum Valley. PM Afternoon birding Danum Valley.
26 - 28 June Danum Valley.
29 June AM Danum Valley. PM Danum Valley - Kota Kinabalu - Mount Kinabalu.
30 June - 2 July Mount Kinabalu.
3 July AM Mount Kinabalu. PM Mount Kinabalu - Poring Hot Springs. Afternoon birding Poring Hot Springs.
4 July AM Poring Hot Springs. PM Poring - Kota Kinabalu.
5 July DEPARTURE.

PENINSULA MALAYSIA (12th - 23rd June)

 

KUALA SELANGOR (13th - 14th June)

Kuala Selangor is a small peaceful coastal town, only a relatively short drive northwestwards from the capital of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur.
So we left the distinctive skyline of the capital behind, dominated by the giant silhouette of the World's largest building, the twin-towered Petronas Towers, and headed for the hot lowland forest and mangrove swamp of Selangor. This is always a good starting point for nay tour, particularly for first time visitors to Asia as there is not the bombardment of families and species found in the rainforest, although there are still very many interesting species special to that coastal habitat. On top of this many of these are quite visible and easy to see so a good starting point for any tour!
The main targets were of course the coastal specialties that were not going to be encountered elsewhere on the tour. Some of the these gave themselves up quickly on the first afternoon like the pair of Golden-bellied Gerygones (also known as Flyeaters), a strange almost flycatcher-like bird that is in its own family. Some relaxed birding around a small hill on the edge of town - Bukit Malawati produced the hoped-for Lineated Barbet located in a fruiting tree, the only site where this species was possible on the tour. Walking around this hill is a pleasant experience, not least because of the extremely tame Silvered Langurs that greet you sitting in the road there, several of which were seen to be holding bright orange young ones (in complete contrast to the adults steely gray pelage color). A night foray on the hill produced a close Collared Scops-Owl calling in our flashlight. In secondary forest in the reserve itself we had several good views of Laced Woodpeckers, again a bird that was only possible at this site on the tour. However, for me the best sighting there was the totally unexpected Barred Eagle-Owl that Fred found perched on a low, thick vine in broad daylight. A real brute of an owl and not easy to come by. In the coastal mangroves themselves we found Brown-capped (Sunda) Woodpeckers that were exceptionally obliging; Mangrove Whistler (that due to its generally all dull gray appearance created little excitement even if it was our only chance on the tour!); a beautiful male Mangrove Blue-Flycatcher; in addition to several Great Tits, that is strangely a mangrove species in southeast Asia. Other birds encountered there that were not recorded anywhere else on the tour included Brahminy Kites (a few of which were visibly nesting); extremely vocal Collared Kingfishers whose noisy calls dominated the background sounds around the reserve; subtly marked Pink-necked Pigeons, flocks of which were frequently encountered in the coastal areas; Oriental White-eyes; Black-naped Orioles (that vied with the Kingfishers for most frequently heard call); Pied Triller; Common Iora and both Greater & Common Flamebacks - both really colorful vividly marked woodpeckers that are always a real pleasure to see. Other birds seen around the area included Coppersmith Barbets, lots of Ashy Tailorbirds and Plain-throated & Olive-backed Sunbirds.


FRASER'S HILL and THE GAP (15th - 17th June)

The old colonial history of Malaysia, that was formerly part of British Malaya, is very evident when visiting Fraser's Hill (in the Malaysian state of Pahang), where there is a distinct feeling you have walked into a remote part of the English countryside, with the quaint clock tower in the center of town and the style of some of the old houses in the area. The British developed the area as an old hill station to escape the humidity of the lowlands. Having left the coastal lowlands of Selangor it was easy to appreciate the pleasant climate at the cooler elevations at Bukit Fraser (Bukit means hill in Malay). At the top of Fraser's Hill the various trails and roads cover an attitudinal range of around 1150-1310m, so that the birds found up there differ markedly from those at the bottom of the hill in the area around The Gap which is much lower at around 790m elevation. As there is a good road that connects these two areas we ensured we birded a number of different sites in the area to cover the full range of species available. Of course one look out of any window at Fraser's Hill at the garden birds and there's no escaping that you are in Southeast Asia - birds like Chestnut-capped Laughingthrushes greeted us daily in the hotel grounds, sometimes along with the superb Streaked Spiderhunter that would sometimes come to feed on the blooming flowers in the garden. While the calls of the fantastic Fire-tufted Barbet were frequently heard in the center of town, and while there we had some great views of this species, the most attractive and instantly recognizable of all the Asian barbets. It was also an important species for us on this leg of the tour as it is only found in the Peninsula and on the island of Sumatra so it was our only chance for this bird. Another species that was frequently seen and heard around the small town in Frasers were marauding flocks of Long-tailed Sibias. One day we cruised up the Telekom Loop searching for feeding flocks as they can hold some really cool birds. We did this on our first morning and in the first flock encountered we found a small party of hyper-active Blue Nuthatches. A really great little bird, they are completely unique in appearance within that family and for me is the best looking species within that family. Other birds that were found in the active feeding flocks at the higher elevations on the top of Fraser's included both Black-eared & White-browed Shrike-Babblers; Silver-eared Mesias; Blue-winged Minlas (with little blue in the wing in the Malaysian form); Mountain Fulvettas; Javan Cuckoo-shrikes; Speckled Piculet (a delightful, diminutive little woodpecker); and noisy parties of gaudy red male Grey-chinned Minivets. On the trails themselves we encountered a few Red-headed Trogons and also managed to see several cute Pygmy Wren-Babblers, while the Lesser Shortwing normally a skulking interior forest bird, that we had expected to see on the forest trails we managed to come across alongside one of the roads up there. Other birds seen up on the hill included the striking Green Magpie; Greater Yellownape, a strikingly patterned woodpecker that was sometimes visible from our hotel; Mountain Imperial Pigeon; Little Cuckoo-Doves were seen unusually well perched (unlike the more typical views of them darting through the forest at lightning speed); a male Large Niltava was the only one recorded on the tour; gorgeous Black-throated Sunbirds and Fire-breasted Flowerpeckers were seen a number of times up on the hill, although this was the only site where we saw them on the tour; while Chestnut-crowned Laughingthrush completed the trio of possible Laughingthrushes in Peninsula Malaysia. However, probably the best bird found around the hill itself was a stunning Silver-breasted Broadbill, one of Fraser's Hills star birds. All the Asian Broadbills are odd-looking, strikingly-patterned, colorful birds and therefore are high on the shopping list for visiting birders. As this was to be our only chance at getting this species on either of the tours we were really pleased to get this one, as it is right up there with the best of the broadbills. Another one of the most wanted birds up there is the Slaty-backed Forktail, (the forktails are a distinctive group of black-and-white Asian flycatchers, that look decidedly unlike flycatchers) and fortunately Bukit Fraser is a superb site for getting this species and we encountered them a number of the times feeding on the edges of the roads. Its not always about the birds though on a tour, and we also came across the infamous Rajah Brookes's Birdwing, an exquisite butterfly named after one of the British Rajah's who served in British Malaya.


Rajah Brookes's Birdwing, Fraser's Hill (Sam Woods)

The Gap was good to us during our time around Fraser's Hill. For our first stop there on the way up to the hill we decided to check out some forest along a quiet road, and just in that one spot we came across a pair of highly- vocal pair of Banded Broadbills, a female Banded Kingfisher, a Whiskered Treeswift and a dazzling Red-bearded Bee-eater! This was before we had even got to Fraser's so was a great start to our time there. On another foray into these lower elevations we targeted a thick stand of bamboo, as there are a number of birds that favor this habitat and we soon picked a number of the aptly-named Bamboo Woodpeckers in addition to a loud flock of Black Laughingthrushes of a very different form to those found in Borneo (and therefore which have often been treated as separate species). At the bottom end of the access road up to Fraser's there is the Gap Resthouse that unfortunately has been closed for much of the time of late, although recently reopened and we enjoyed some of their famed good Malay cuisine while checking out the fruiting trees in the area which produced the hoped for barbets in the form and several Gold-whiskered & Black-browed Barbets. We also spent an evening around the deserted guesthouse, to watch the Malaysian (Eared) Nightjars that hawk around the resthouse garden at dusk. Although the Bat Hawk that flew by a short time before was more widely appreciated by the group. One of the most impressive bird families in Malaysia (and southeast Asia as a whole) are the hornbills. Fortunately Malaysia has an abundance of them, and is a great place for catching up with some of the more spectacular species. They are much more often heard giving their loud far-carrying calls than seen although on hearing a Rhinoceros Hornbill at the Gap we hurried toward the sound and found a pair of these amazing birds perched in a close tree where we could see the bright orange horns that give them their name really well, before they flew off calling loudly as they did so. It was fitting to get this one first on the trip as it had been the one bird that Fred had stated that he wanted to see the most. Other birds seen down at The Gap included Blyth's Hawk-Eagle, Black-thighed Falconet, Orange-breasted Trogon, Rufous-bellied Swallow (that due to recent DNA studies having given this full species status from Red-rumped & Striated Swallows, C. Daurica and C. Striolata respectively, that are all separated geographically this Malaysian form is now an endemic species to the Malay Peninsula), Grey-rumped Treeswift, Everret's White-eye, Rufous Piculet, Yellow-bellied Warbler and Chestnut-backed Scimitar-Babbler.


Whiskered Treeswift (Sam Woods)

 

TAMAN NEGARA (18th - 23rd June)

Taman Negara is mainland Malaysia's premier national park, proclaiming itself as the 'oldest rainforest in the world'. Whether or not this is true is neither here nor there, it is quite simply a stunning piece of lowland dipterocarp rainforest, that is loaded with plenty of Broadbills, Trogons, Pittas and therefore holds some of the Peninsula's most sought-after birds. In order to reach the park we took a leisurely boat ride down the Sungei Tembeling, which allowed us to pick some birds up along the way. The boat trip up the river passes through some nice forest and we managed to see tons of colorful Blue-throated Bee-eaters, many of which were nesting in the sandy banks along there; a fly by Wallace's Hawk-Eagle that proved to be the only sighting of this leg of the trip; a few Stork-billed Kingfishers; a pair of Blue-rumped Parrots and a number of Silver-rumped Needletails swooping low over the water for insects. After a late arrival we had limited time for birding although a quick sweep with the flashlight near our cabins in the resort did produce a Buffy Fish Owl that sat out nicely for us. Finding a good fruiting tree is always a target for visiting birders, and luckily during our time there a few were in good condition right inside the resort. In one lunch sitting we watched a small fruiting tree from our dinner table which was visited by 14 different species including Thick-billed Pigeon, Greater Green Leafbird, Red-throated Barbet, Asian Glossy Starling, Crimson-breasted & Yellow-vented Flowerpeckers and a bunch of different Bulbuls, including Cream-vented Bulbul. While another fruiting tree in the resort held the scarce Scaly-breasted Bulbul among a host of other frugivores that included the globally-threatened Straw-headed Bulbul and Asian Fairy-Bluebird. One of the shyest and most secretive of the Malaysian families is the Pittas. However they are also one of the most colorful and beautiful groups of birds in the world so unsurprisingly all birders coming to Taman Negara are always extremely keen to see them. People in this group were no different and in fact Lee had told me on the first night that one of his targets for the tour was to see his first pitta. On our first morning at Taman Negara we set about doing just that, focusing on a quiet forest trail, rarely visited by the many other non-birding tourists that visit the park, that is traditionally a good area for seeing some of these pittas. Our particular target for that morning was the Garnet Pitta, a species that would only possible for us on the tour at Taman Negara as they are replaced in Borneo by another endemic Pitta species. Sure enough late in the morning we began to hear their monotone whistles and set about trying to see them. We required a little ingenuity scrambling a short distance from the trail, although when this gorgeous bird alighted on a nearby branch I don't think anyone had any complaints - a really stunner with deep crimson underparts and crown that glow red in the shade of the forest undergrowth. Lee had got his first Pitta. This Pitta would probably be a contender for bird of trip anywhere else although Taman Negara has a surfeit of bright gaudy birds to choose from and we saw plenty more in our time there. What was intended to be a short walk behind our cabins, turned into a whole mornings birding there on one day as there was unusually high activity and we returned with a good haul that included the mindblowing Banded Pitta that for me is quite simply one of the best-looking birds in the World, with its fiery red eyebrow, deep purple underparts and rufous upperparts, just nothing beats the sight of seeing a male bouncing along the forest floor. Thankfully we were treated to just that as we had one hopping across in front of us in an open part of the forest. That same incredible morning also produced a pair of Green Broadbills and a Jambu Fruit Dove found feeding in the same fruiting tree! Other highlights of our time there included 4 species of Broadbill, with in addition to the aforementioned Green, Black-and-Red, Black-and-Yellow & Banded Broadbills seen well by everyone.


Juvenile Banded Broadbill, Taman Negara (Sam Woods)

We also did well for hornbills there, with 5 species seen in our time, with the good perched views of the rarely-encountered, globally threatened Wrinkled Hornbill topping the list. We also saw more Rhinoceros Hornbills and added Wreathed, Bushy-crested, Black & Oriental Pied Hornbills to the list. Although probably the best bird in our time at Taman Negara was one of the true forest skulkers, Malaysian Rail-Babbler, a bird that is much more often heard than seen. A species that even people who have made several visits to the region have often not seen. It is also one of those oddities for the southeast Asian region as the only representative there of a family that contains birds like the Whipbirds of Australia and the Jewel-Babblers of New Guinea. So on hearing its characteristic, Garnet-pitta like call we decided to try and get this one, and thankfully on this occasion the bird decided to cooperate, responding really well to playback of its call. The Rail-Babbler always kept to the forest undergrowth as they always do although it lingered in a nice gap in the vegetation allowing us some really good looks at what for is one of Asia's top birds, both for the level of difficulty in trying to see one and also just the weirdness of the bird from its strange, chicken like gait to the bizarre bare blue neck pouches that are inflated when calling. A really classic bird. Other highlights included Diard's, Scarlet-rumped & Red-naped Trogons; Black-bellied, Chestnut-breasted & Raffle's Malkohas; Checker-throated, Great Slaty, Buff-necked and Grey-and-Buff Woodpeckers; a pair of Malaysian Blue-Flycatchers by the river (they favor riparian habitats); daily Blue-crowned Hanging-Parrots overflying the resort; a Rufous-winged Philentoma and a whole host of Babblers including the striking Black-thoated Babbler and Striped & Large Wren-Babblers.


Black-and-Yellow Broadbill, Danum Valley (Sam Woods)

 

BORNEO (24th June - 5th July)

 

DANUM VALLEY (BORNEO RAINFOREST LODGE) (25th - 29th June)

The area of forest around the Borneo Rainforest Lodge is one of the most pristine examples of ancient lowland dipterocarp forest. The superb lodge facilities - some of the best in southeast Asia (with a combination of great rooms overlooking the forested river banks; quality food and excellent service), make birding in this area a real treat, and everyone definitely left with the feeling they had visited somewhere really special. With good forest comes great birds although Danum has a bit more than that, because it is also the stronghold for one of Borneo's most famous and threatened animals - the so called 'old man of the forest' - more commonly known as Orangutan, Asia's sole representative of the Great Apes. Danum is a good, reliable place to see this fascinating primate and we saw them a number of times while we there including one period where we came across three different individuals in one hour, that included one animal that made its nest for the night right outside our cabins. This is another of the interesting things about the Orangutan, that it is the only primate in the World that makes a nest, making a fresh one each evening. Of course there were birds too, although for many the Orang-Utans were as good as any of the birds. Danum is an excellent place for mammals and other interesting species seen there included a number of the endemic Maroon Langur (or Red Leaf Monkey); a troop of Bornean Gibbons that made there way past the lodge each morning; a single male Proboscis Monkey (in Danum, a rarely seen endemic primate) sporting the huge overdeveloped nose that gives it its name; a Slow Loris on one of the productive night drives; several sightings of Lesser Mouse Deer; a single Malay Civet; Oriental Small-Clawed Otter; Yellow-throated Marten; Thomas's & Red Giant Flying Squirrels; and the the just plain odd Flying Lemur or Malayan Colugo.


Orangutan, Danum Valley (Sam Woods)

Maroon Langur, Danum Valley (Sam Woods)


The strange Malayan Colugo or Flying Lemur
(that is completely unrelated to lemurs), Danum Valley
(Sam Woods)

Enough about the mammals though, what about the birds?! While most of the majority of the Bornean endemics are found in the montane forests at higher elevations there are a few particularly special ones in the lowland rainforest, not least several gaudy Pittas. The first of which - Black-headed Pitta gave itself up very easily on our first afternoon birding close to the lodge, when a calling bird flew in and perched conveniently on a dead wooden stump on the side of the trail so that everyone got good looks. Generally similar in appearance to Garnet Pitta on the Peninsula with which it used to be considered conspecifc, although is now considered a different species on the basis of its different vocalizations and plumage differences, lacking the red cap of its mainland counterpart. The other endemic pitta we had hoped to see we almost stumbled across by chance as it responded to the background sound of another Blue-headed Pitta, on a recording I was playing of another species. As soon as the pitta began responding, we decided to forget that bird and go straight for the brightly colored pitta, and a short time later the bird flew up onto an open branch for a short time, although unfortunately a few people missed what had been good if brief views. With such a great looking bird we refused to give up yet and our patience paid of handsomely in the end when the same bird flew up once again, this time perching in full view for much longer so that everyone got very satisfying long looks at it. A beautifully patterned bird, we were lucky to get a purple-breasted, electric blue-capped male, that proved to be our fourth and final pitta of the whole trip. The other endemics that Danum has to offer are 2 elusive Wren-Babblers, that initially proved a little tricky before we got cracking views of a pair of Black-throated Wren-Babblers that came within a few meters of us; and a Bornean Wren-Babbler later responded similarly after several individuals had played with us for a while first, making getting that one at the end all the sweeter! With these two in the lowlands we then only needed the Mountain Wren-Babbler in the mountains to complete the set of Babblers that are confined to Borneo. In addition to those species we also had some good views of Striped Wren-Babbler whilst at Danum. The other star endemic in the lowland forests around the Borneo Rainforest Lodge is another one of these oddities that has always been a taxonomic puzzle, taxonomists never really sure where to put the species and where its affinities lie, so it currently occupies its own endemic bird family - the Bristleheads. Not only an endemic species, but also an endemic family. Coupled with this, the Bornean Bristlehead is actually a fine looking bird with some bizarre vocalizations, although seems to have a large home range so they can go missing for weeks at a time and prove challenging to see. Having said that Danum is probably the best place in the world to see the species, and being a canopy bird we centered our searches for it around the lodge's canopy tower. After some time waiting and scanning the tree tops, our local guide picked up first the call of the bird, then a distant view of a pair of these odd birds. Unfortunately they were in the worst position they could be in, as only a few people could safely view them from the walkway at any one time, leaving many with a tense wait. The birds soon moved off before most people had seen them, although as they had moved back towards the road we hurried back there frantically scanning the trees on arrival when we eventually picked up 2 or 3 individuals of which everyone got good looks of at least one. We then later saw them on several more occasions (making the stress of initially finding seem futile), including a small group that hung around long enough for us to go and get some other birders to come and see them also.


The enigmatic Bornean Bristlehead, Danum Valley (Sam Woods)

Aside from the above endemics the other key lowland ones included a tiny raptor, the White-fronted Falconet, a female of which we found perched on a dead snag beside the road and Yellow-rumped Flowerpeckers were seen a number of times in roadside flowers, while Dusky Munias could be seen nesting from our cabin balconies. One of the other families that are well-represented in Asia are the pheasants, and an undoubted highlight was watching a small party of Crested Firebacks (as dramatic in appearance as their name suggests), parade past the lodge each morning (seemingly oblivious of us watching them from a short distance above from the wooden walkways). The other phasianid recorded there was a pair of Chestnut-necklaced Partridges on our last morning. Regular raptors included a Lesser Fish-Eagle that was seen a number of times either along the Sungai Segama (Sungai means river in Malay) at the back of our bungalows, or from our dinner table in the lodge restaurant, while a Jerdon's Baza gave good perched views along the entrance road on several occasions. Trogons were again well-represented in the lowland forests at Danum, with one afternoon producing 3 species in one day - Diard's, Scarlet-rumped & Red-naped Trogons. The scarce Moustached Hawk-Cuckoo and the recently split Malaysian Hawk-Cuckoo (formerly considered a race of Hodgson's) were both recorded close to the lodge as were Violet & Little Bronze Cuckoos; while both Raffles & Chestnut-breasted Malkohas were seen a number of times; the night drives produced good birds as well as mammals with Buffy Fish-Owl recorded a few times sitting on an open pole close to some of the lodge buildings, although the Javan Frogmouth that the keen-eyed Bornean guide found in the flashlight was much more impressive; Grey-rumped & Whiskered Treeswifts were recorded regularly, an individual of the latter species having a regular daily perch close to the lodge; and Red-bearded Bee-eater was found again for those who were not on the mainland part of the tour. Hornbills were again good to us on this section of the tour with 6 species seen, largely due to a number of fruiting trees that helped us find some of the more difficult species - one large fig tree held some Rhinceros, Black & Bushy-crested Hornbills (a roost of 11 closely huddled birds of the latter species were also recorded on one of the good night drives run by the lodge), while an area of fruiting trees found along the river on our final morning was simply loaded with birds and animals feasting on the harvest. These included including a pair of 'ugly' Helmeted Hornbills (whose strange contorted and wrinkled facial skin appears in serious need of plastic surgery!), more Rhinoceros & Black Hornbills, a single White-crowned Hornbill, a Giant Squirrel and an Orangutan! The Helmeted Hornbills were especially pleasing to see as they possess one of the greatest of all Asian bird calls that ends in a characteristic cackle of what sounds like a mocking laughter, and we had heard this a number of times without having a sniff at the bird until then. Its a great call to listen to although as it is far-carrying and can be heard quite often, it creates some desperation to get to see the owner of the bizarre call after a while! Broadbills are always popular with first time visitors to Asia, and the Black-and-Yellow Broadbill seen before reaching the lodge definitely caused a stir for those who had not been on the peninsula part of the tour; while a pair of Black-and-Red Broadbills greeted us early every morning by the lodge, where they came to feed on the insects attracted to the lodge lights during the night. Dusky Broadbill (that had eluded us at Taman Negara on the Peninsula) and Banded Broadbills were also recorded at Danum. Woodpeckers included Orange-backed Woodpecker, one of the larger and more impressive species, Crimson-winged Woodpecker, and the tiny Rufous Piculet. Other highlights in our time at the Borneo Rainforest Lodge included a good set of blue flycatchers, with singing males Malaysian Blue Flycatchers, Bornean Blue Flycatcher and the globally-threatened Long-billed (or Large-billed) Blue Flycatcher all seen well; a Rufous-chested Flycatcher; 2 species of Forktail - the stunning Chestnut-naped Forktail and White-crowned Forktail was seen for the first time on the tour (they were also recorded on Kinabalu); a bunch of babblers including Fluffy-backed Tit-Babbler; gaudy red male Scarlet Minivets glowed from the treetops from the lodge's canopy walkway; both Rufous-winged & Maroon-breasted Philentomas; several views of Crested Jays; and the distinctive Bornean form of Black Magpie (that lacks the white wing markings of its mainland counterpart).

 

MOUNT KINABALU (29th June - 2nd July)

This distinctive mountain is often visible from Sabah's capital, Kota Kinabalu. The sheer height of the mountain (4095m), the highest between the Himalayas and New Guinea, along with its unique, jagged granite pinnacles on its peak, make this mountain instantly recognizable. The mountain is popular for climbers and backpackers, as it is considered a relatively easy climb, although for birders the appeal is that the majority of Borneo's endemic species are found on the flanks of Kinabalu. There is a good trail network and accommodation around the headquarters (ranging in altitude from around 1588m at the HQ itself to 1866m at Timphon gate), and as most non-birding visitors are only interested in climbing up to the summit these are often conveniently deserted. Having arrived at night direct from Danum, we had a really great first experience of birding on the mountain, as the first rush of activity on Kinabalu can be a really exciting introduction to the birds there. Staying within the park we only had to walk a few meters outside our rooms and we began seeing birds like the garden dwelling Chestnut-capped Laughingthrushes (a familiar garden bird to some of from our time at Fraser's Hill), although the sundaic endemic Sunda Laughingthrush was new for us all (and on some days were joined by the weird, ugly endemic bald-headed form of Black Laughingthrush that many consider a good species - Bare-headed Laughingthrush), as were the Black-capped White-eyes and brilliant Bornean Treepies (the latter one of the key endemics there). These early morning bursts of activity were a regular feature on the mountain, and a visit to the power station paid off well at these times when the Bornean Treepies and distinctive form of Ashy Drongos would be joined by other species like Bornean Whistling-Thrush, Indigo Flycatcher, and on one morning the endemic Golden-naped Barbet showed well in a fruiting tree there, while the much scarcer Mountain Barbet was picked up by Fred in a fruiting tree further on down the road.


Golden-naped Barbet, Mt. Kinabalu (Sam Woods)

Probably the highlight of our time there was on one of the early morning drives up the road when we stopped for some activity by the road, the extremely secretive and rarely encountered Everett's Thrush hopped up onto a roadside crash barrier as we looked on incredulous. Some experienced birders who have visited this area a number of times have left empty-handed when looking for this shy endemic. Also along the road on this morning was one of several Orange-headed Thrushes seen feeding on a roadside verge. Not an endemic, but looking like that it does not matter! Other regular birds around the gardens and roadsides included small chattering flocks of endemic Chestnut-crested Yuhinas, along with Mountain Warblers and the brightly colored Yellow-breasted Warbler. Some of these flocks also held a few Bornean Whistlers. An Eye-browed Jungle-Flycatcher, yet another Bornean specialty conveniently appeared by our cabins on one morning with others noted elsewhere during our stay; while fruiting trees by the restaurant there produced two key endemics in the form of Black-sided Flowerpecker and better still, Mountain Black-eye a bird more usually associated with higher altitudes on the mountain. The restaurant also proved lucky for us on another morning when the endemic Mountain Serpent-Eagle passed overhead, while the stunning Temminck's Sunbird was a permanent fixture from the balcony over breakfast there. On the trails we targeted some of the more skulking of the Bornean specialties, picking up several Bornean Stubtails whose extremely high-pitched, soft calls can often be hard to pick out from the background noise, being barely audible to the human ear at times; and also a few Mountain Wren-Babblers that completed the trio of endemic Wren-Babblers for the trip; in addition to a White-browed Shortwing. Other highlights in our time there included Black-and-Crimson Orioles and dazzling green Short-tailed Magpies; Mountain Imperial Pigeon; Snowy-browed Flycatcher; and the Bornean montane form of Blue-winged Leafbird (more typically a lowland species elsewhere in its range) that many authors consider a full species.


Snowy-browed Flycatcher, Mt. Kinabalu (Sam Woods)

 

PORING HOT SPRINGS (3rd - 4th July)

Our final scheduled site for the tour was also within the Kinabalu National Park, at a much lower elevation - around 460m - and a further 40km drive from the headquarters where we had been based previously. En-route to the park we made sure we stopped to have a look at a Rafflesia that was flowering at the time, Borneo's most famous plant, the largest species of which produces the largest flower of any plant in the World.


Rafflesia sp., Poring (Sam Woods)

Poring made for a good place for some downtime after a long tour, what with its naturally fed sulfurous springs, relaxed atmosphere and good birds right around the resort. These included a superb male Banded Kingfisher; Black-and-Yellow Broadbill; a Banded Woodpecker above us while we ate our final breakfast of the tour; a pair of vocal Crested Jays right around the baths themselves; Gold-whiskered Barbets; Greater & Lesser Green Leafbirds; a pair of calling Grey-headed Babblers; Grey-breasted, Little & Spectacled Spiderhunters feeding on the resort flowers; Orange-breasted Flowerpecker and the endemics Yellow-rumped Flowerpecker and Dusky Munias were added to our earlier sightings at Danum.

After our final morning at Poring we left for Kota Kinabalu for those with earlier departures, while the rest of us took a leisurely stroll around a mangrove area near to KK, where we added some coastal species that had not been possible elsewhere on the Bornean leg of the tour. These included majestic White-bellied Sea-Eagles (that were also seen cruising over the center of KK); Brahminy Kite; Blue-eared & Collared Kingfishers; Pied Trillers; Pink-necked Pigeons; Ashy Tailorbirds; and the globally-threatened Straw-headed Bulbul, that some of us knew from our time on the mainland. We then retired to KK and enjoyed our final and perhaps best meal of the tour in a new Chinese restaurant in Kota Kinabalu, looking back on the pittas, broadbills, firebacks and Orangutans that we had all seen over the past few weeks.

 

BIRD LISTS

Taxonomy and nomenclature follow: Clements, James F. 2000. Birds of the World: A Checklist. Fifth Edition. Vista, CA: Ibis Publishing Co. Includes recent updates.

All the birds on this list were seen by at least one person in the group other than the leader, except those marked with an 'H' which were only heard.

PENINSULA MALAYSIA

HERONS, EGRETS and BITTERNS (CICONIIFORMES: Ardeidae)
Gray Heron (Ardea cinerea)
Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea)
Great Egret (Ardea alba)
Striated Heron (Butorides striata)
Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax)

HAWKS, EAGLES and KITES (FALCONIFORMES: Accipitridae)
Bat Hawk (Macheiramphus alcinus)
Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus)
Crested Serpent-Eagle (Spilornis cheela)
Black Eagle (Ictinaetus malayensis)
Rufous-bellied Eagle (Aquila kienerii)
Blyth's Hawk-Eagle (Spizaetus alboniger)
Wallace's Hawk-Eagle (Spizaetus nanus)

FALCONS (FALCONIFORMES: Falconidae)
Black-thighed Falconet (Microhierax fringillarius)

PHEASANTS and PARTRIDGES (GALLIFORMES: Phasianidae)
Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus) H
Malayan Peacock-Pheasant (Polyplectron malacense) H
Great Argus (Argusianus argus) H

RAILS, GALLINULES and COOTS (GRUIFORMES: Rallidae)
White-breasted Waterhen (Amaurornis phoenicurus)

PLOVERS and LAPWINGS (CHARADRIIFORMES: Charadriidae)
Red-wattled Lapwing (Vanellus indicus)

PIGEONS and DOVES (COLUMBIFORMES: Columbidae)
Rock Pigeon (Columba livia)
Spotted Dove (Streptopelia chinensis)
Little Cuckoo-Dove (Macropygia ruficeps)
Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps indica)
Zebra Dove (Geopelia striata)
Pink-necked Pigeon (Treron vernans)
Thick-billed Pigeon (Treron curvirostra)
Jambu Fruit-Dove (Ptilinopus jambu)
Green Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula aenea)
Mountain Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula badia)

PARROTS (PSITTACIFORMES: Psittacidae)
Blue-rumped Parrot (Psittinus cyanurus)
Blue-crowned Hanging-Parrot (Loriculus galgulus)

CUCKOOS (CUCULIFORMES: Cuculidae)
Large Hawk-Cuckoo (Cuculus sparverioides) H
Plaintive Cuckoo (Cacomantis merulinus)
Brush Cuckoo (Cacomantis variolosus)
Little Bronze-Cuckoo (Chrysococcyx minutillus) H
Asian Drongo-Cuckoo (Surniculus lugubris)
Asian Koel (Eudynamys scolopacea)
Black-bellied Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus diardi)
Green-billed Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus tristis)
Raffles's Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus chlorophaeus)
Chestnut-breasted Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus curvirostris)
Greater Coucal (Centropus sinensis)

OWLS (STRIGIFORMES: Strigidae)
Mountain Scops-Owl (Otus spilocephalus) H
Collared Scops-Owl (Otus lettia)

Barred Eagle-Owl (Bubo sumatranus)
Buffy Fish-Owl (Ketupa ketupu)
Collared Owlet (Glaucidium brodiei) H

NIGHTJARS (CAPRIMULGIFORMES: Caprimulgidae)
Malaysian Nightjar Eurostopodus temminckii

SWIFTS (APODIFORMES: Apodidae)
Glossy Swiftlet (Collocalia esculenta)
German's Swiftlet (Aerodramus germani)
Silver-rumped Needletail (Rhaphidura leucopygialis)
Silver-backed Needletail (Hirundapus cochinchinensis)
House Swift (Apus nipalensis)

TREESWIFTS (APODIFORMES: Hemiprocnidae)
Gray-rumped Treeswift (Hemiprocne longipennis)
Whiskered Treeswift (Hemiprocne comata)

TROGONS (TROGONIFORMES: Trogonidae)
Red-naped Trogon (Harpactes kasumba)
Diard's Trogon (Harpactes diardii)
Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii)
Red-headed Trogon (Harpactes erythrocephalus)
Orange-breasted Trogon (Harpactes oreskios)

KINGFISHERS (CORACIIFORMES: Alcedinidae)
Blue-eared Kingfisher (Alcedo meninting)
Blue-banded Kingfisher (Alcedo euryzona)
Banded Kingfisher (Lacedo pulchella)
Stork-billed Kingfisher (Pelargopsis capensis)
White-throated Kingfisher (Halcyon smyrnensis)
Collared Kingfisher (Todirhamphus chloris)

BEE-EATERS (CORACIIFORMES: Meropidae)
Red-bearded Bee-eater (Nyctyornis amictus)
Blue-throated Bee-eater (Merops viridis)

ROLLERS (CORACIIFORMES: Coraciidae)
Dollarbird (Eurystomus orientalis)

HORNBILLS (CORACIIFORMES: Bucerotidae)
Oriental Pied-Hornbill (Anthracoceros albirostris)
Black Hornbill (Anthracoceros malayanus)
Rhinoceros Hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros)
Helmeted Hornbill (Buceros vigil) H
Bushy-crested Hornbill (Anorrhinus galeritus)
Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus)
Wreathed Hornbill (Aceros undulatus)

BARBETS (PICIFORMES: Capitonidae)
Fire-tufted Barbet (Psilopogon pyrolophus)
Lineated Barbet (Megalaima lineata)
Gold-whiskered Barbet (Megalaima chrysopogon)
Red-crowned Barbet (Megalaima rafflesii)
Red-throated Barbet (Megalaima mystacophanos)
Golden-throated Barbet (Megalaima franklinii) H
Black-browed Barbet (Megalaima oorti)
Blue-eared Barbet (Megalaima australis) H
Coppersmith Barbet (Megalaima haemacephala)
Brown Barbet (Calorhamphus fuliginosus)

WOODPECKERS (PICIFORMES: Picidae)
Speckled Piculet (Picumnus innominatus)
Rufous Piculet (Sasia abnormis)
Brown-capped (Sunda)Woodpecker (Dendrocopos moluccensis)
Crimson-winged Woodpecker (Picus puniceus) H
Greater Yellownape (Picus flavinucha)
Checker-throated Woodpecker (Picus mentalis)
Laced Woodpecker (Picus vittatus)
Common Flameback (Dinopium javanense)
Greater Flameback (Chrysocolaptes lucidus)
Bamboo Woodpecker (Gecinulus viridis)
Maroon Woodpecker (Blythipicus rubiginosus)
Bay Woodpecker (Blythipicus pyrrhotis) H
Buff-necked Woodpecker (Meiglyptes tukki)
Gray-and-buff Woodpecker (Hemicircus concretus)
Great Slaty Woodpecker (Mulleripicus pulverulentus)

BROADBILLS (PASSERIFORMES: Eurylaimidae)
Black-and-red Broadbill (Cymbirhynchus macrorhynchos)
Banded Broadbill (Eurylaimus javanicus)
Black-and-yellow Broadbill (Eurylaimus ochromalus)
Silver-breasted Broadbill (Serilophus lunatus)
Green Broadbill (Calyptomena viridis)

PITTAS (PASSERIFORMES: Pittidae)
Giant Pitta (Pitta caerulea) H
Banded Pitta Pitta guajana
Garnet Pitta Pitta granatina

SWALLOWS (PASSERIFORMES: Hirundinidae)
Pacific Swallow (Hirundo tahitica)
Rufous-bellied Swallow (Cecropis badia)

CUCKOO-SHRIKES (PASSERIFORMES: Campephagidae)
Javan Cuckoo-shrike (Coracina javensis)
Pied Triller (Lalage nigra)
Gray-chinned Minivet (Pericrocotus solaris)
Bar-winged Flycatcher-shrike (Hemipus picatus)

BULBULS (PASSERIFORMES: Pycnonotidae)
Straw-headed Bulbul (Pycnonotus zeylanicus)
Black-headed Bulbul (Pycnonotus atriceps)
Black-crested Bulbul (Pycnonotus melanicterus)
Scaly-breasted Bulbul (Pycnonotus squamatus)
Gray-bellied Bulbul (Pycnonotus cyaniventris)
Puff-backed Bulbul (Pycnonotus eutilotus)
Stripe-throated Bulbul (Pycnonotus finlaysoni)
Yellow-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus goiavier)
Olive-winged Bulbul (Pycnonotus plumosus)
Streak-eared Bulbul (Pycnonotus blanfordi)
Cream-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus simplex)
Red-eyed Bulbul (Pycnonotus brunneus)
Spectacled Bulbul (Pycnonotus erythropthalmos)
Ochraceous Bulbul (Alophoixus ochraceus)
Gray-cheeked Bulbul (Alophoixus bres)
Yellow-bellied Bulbul (Alophoixus phaeocephalus)
Hairy-backed Bulbul (Tricholestes criniger)
Buff-vented Bulbul (Iole olivacea)
Ashy Bulbul (Hemixos flavala)
Mountain Bulbul (Ixos mcclellandii)

LEAFBIRDS (PASSERIFORMES: Chloropseidae)
Greater Green Leafbird (Chloropsis sonnerati)
Lesser Green Leafbird (Chloropsis cyanopogon)
Blue-winged Leafbird (Chloropsis cochinchinensis)
Orange-bellied Leafbird (Chloropsis hardwickii)

IORAS (PASSERIFORMES: Aegithinidae)
Common Iora (Aegithina tiphia)

THRUSHES (PASSERIFORMES: Turdidae)
Lesser Shortwing (Brachypteryx leucophrys)

OLD WORLD WARBLERS (PASSERIFORMES: Sylviidae)
Mountain Tailorbird (Orthotomus cuculatus)
Common Tailorbird (Orthotomus sutorius)
Dark-necked Tailorbird (Orthotomus atrogularis)
Ashy Tailorbird (Orthotomus ruficeps)
Chestnut-crowned Warbler (Seicercus castaniceps)
Yellow-bellied Warbler (Abroscopus superciliaris)

OLD WORLD FLYCATCHERS (PASSERIFORMES: Muscicapidae)
Rufous-browed Flycatcher (Ficedula solitaris)
Rufous-chested Flycatcher (Ficedula dumetoria)
Little Pied Flycatcher (Ficedula westermanni)
Verditer Flycatcher (Eumyias thalassina)
Large Niltava (Niltava grandis)
Hill Blue-Flycatcher (Cyornis banyumas) H
Malaysian Blue-Flycatcher (Cyornis turcosus)
Mangrove Blue-Flycatcher (Cyornis rufigastra)
Oriental Magpie-Robin (Copsychus saularis)
White-rumped Shama (Copsychus malabaricus)
Slaty-backed Forktail (Enicurus schistaceus)

FANTAILS (PASSERIFORMES: Rhipiduridae)
White-throated Fantail (Rhipidura albicollis)
Pied Fantail (Rhipidura javanica)
Spotted Fantail (Rhipidura perlata)

MONARCH FLYCATCHERS (PASSERIFORMES: Monarchidae)
Black-naped Monarch (Hypothymis azurea)
Asian Paradise-Flycatcher (Terpsiphone paradisi)

WHISTLERS (PASSERIFORMES: Pachycephalidae)
Mangrove Whistler (Pachycephala grisola)

BABBLERS (PASSERIFORMES: Timaliidae)
Black Laughingthrush (Garrulax lugubris)
Chestnut-capped Laughingthrush (Garrulax mitratus)
Chestnut-crowned Laughingthrush (Garrulax erythrocephalus)
White-chested Babbler (Trichastoma rostratum)
Abbott's Babbler (Malacocincla abbotti)
Short-tailed Babbler (Malacocincla malaccensis)
Black-capped Babbler (Pellorneum capistratum)
Moustached Babbler (Malacopteron magnirostre)
Sooty-capped Babbler (Malacopteron affine)
Scaly-crowned Babbler (Malacopteron cinereum)
Rufous-crowned Babbler (Malacopteron magnum)
Chestnut-backed Scimitar-Babbler (Pomatorhinus montanus)
Striped Wren-Babbler (Kenopia striata)
Large Wren-Babbler (Napothera macrodactyla)
Pygmy Wren-Babbler (Pnoepyga pusilla)
Rufous-fronted Babbler (Stachyris rufifrons)
Golden Babbler (Stachyris chrysaea)
Gray-throated Babbler (Stachyris nigriceps)
Gray-headed Babbler (Stachyris poliocephala)
Black-throated Babbler (Stachyris nigricollis)
Chestnut-winged Babbler (Stachyris erythroptera)
Striped Tit-Babbler (Macronous gularis)
Silver-eared Mesia (Leiothrix argentauris)
White-browed Shrike-Babbler (Pteruthius flaviscapis)
Black-eared Shrike-Babbler (Pteruthius melanotis)
Blue-winged Minla (Minla cyanouroptera)
Brown Fulvetta (Alcippe brunneicauda)
Mountain Fulvetta (Alcippe peracensis)
Long-tailed Sibia (Heterophasia picaoides)
White-bellied Yuhina (Yuhina zantholeuca)

LOGRUNNERS, WHIPBIRDS and QUAIL-THRUSHES (PASSERIFORMES: Eupetidae)
Malaysian Rail-babbler (Eupetes macrocerus)

THORNBILLS and ALLIES (PASSERIFORMES: Acanthizidae)
Golden-bellied Gerygone (Gerygone sulphurea)

TITS (PASSERIFORMES: Paridae)
Great Tit (Parus major)

NUTHATCHES (PASSERIFORMES: Sittidae)
Blue Nuthatch (Sitta azurea)

SUNBIRDS (PASSERIFORMES: Nectariniidae)
Ruby-cheeked Sunbird (Chalcoparia singalensis)
Plain-throated Sunbird (Anthreptes malacensis)
Olive-backed Sunbird (Cinnyris jugularis)
Black-throated Sunbird (Aethopyga saturata)
Yellow-eared Spiderhunter (Arachnothera chrysogenys)
Streaked Spiderhunter (Arachnothera magna)

FLOWERPECKERS (PASSERIFORMES: Dicaeidae)
Crimson-breasted Flowerpecker (Prionochilus percussus)
Yellow-vented Flowerpecker (Dicaeum chrysorrheum)
Fire-breasted Flowerpecker (Dicaeum ignipectus)

WHITE-EYES (PASSERIFORMES: Zosteropidae)
Oriental White-eye (Zosterops palpebrosus)
Everett's White-eye (Zosterops everetti)

ORIOLES (PASSERIFORMES: Oriolidae)
Black-naped Oriole (Oriolus chinensis)

FAIRY-BLUEBIRDS (PASSERIFORMES: Irenidae)
Asian Fairy-bluebird (Irena puella)

HELMETSHRIKES and ALLIES (PASSERIFORMES: Prionopidae)
Rufous-winged Philentoma (Philentoma pyrhopterum)

DRONGOS (PASSERIFORMES: Dicruridae)
Ashy Drongo (Dicrurus leucophaeus)
Bronzed Drongo (Dicrurus aeneus)
Lesser Racket-tailed Drongo (Dicrurus remifer)
Greater Racket-tailed Drongo (Dicrurus paradiseus)

CROWS, JAYS and MAGPIES (PASSERIFORMES: Corvidae)
Crested Jay (Platylophus galericulatus)
Black Magpie (Platysmurus leucopterus) H
Green Magpie (Cissa chinensis)
House Crow (Corvus splendens)
Large-billed Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos)

STARLINGS (PASSERIFORMES: Sturnidae)
Asian Glossy Starling (Aplonis panayensis)
Common Hill Myna (Gracula religiosa)
Jungle Myna (Acridotheres fuscus)
Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis)

WAXBILLS and ALLIES (PASSERIFORMES: Estrildidae)
White-rumped Munia (Lonchura striata)
Nutmeg Mannikin (Lonchura punctulata)

OLD WORLD SPARROWS (PASSERIFORMES: Passeridae)
Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus)

 

BORNEO
ANHINGAS (PELECANIFORMES: Anhingidae)
Darter (Anhinga melanogaster)

HERONS, EGRETS and BITTERNS (CICONIIFORMES: Ardeidae)
Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea)
Great Egret (Ardea alba)
Little Egret (Egretta garzetta)
Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis)
Striated Heron (Butorides striata)
Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax)

HAWKS, EAGLES and KITES (FALCONIFORMES: Accipitridae)
Jerdon's Baza (Aviceda jerdoni)
Black-shouldered Kite (Elanus caeruleus)
Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus)
White-bellied Sea-Eagle (Haliaeetus luecogaster)
Lesser Fish-Eagle (Ichthyophaga ichthyaetus)
Mountain Serpent-Eagle (Spilornis kinabaluensis)
Crested Serpent-Eagle (Spilornis cheela)
Crested Goshawk (Accipiter trivirgatus)
Besra (Accipiter virgatus)
Wallace's Hawk-Eagle (Spizaetus nanus)

FALCONS (FALCONIFORMES: Falconidae)
White-fronted Falconet (Microhierax latifrons)

PHEASANTS and PARTRIDGES (GALLIFORMES: Phasianidae)
Red-breasted Partridge (Arborophila hyperythra) H
Chesnut-necklaced Partridge (Arborophila charltonii)
Crimson-headed Partridge (Haematortyx sanguiniceps) H
Crested Fireback (Lophura ignita)
Great Argus (Argusianus argus) H

RAILS, GALLINULES and COOTS (GRUIFORMES: Rallidae)
White-breasted Waterhen (Amaurornis phoenicurus)

PIGEONS and DOVES (COLUMBIFORMES: Columbidae)
Rock Pigeon (Columba livia)
Spotted Dove (Streptopelia chinensis)
Little Cuckoo-Dove (Macropygia ruficeps)
Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps indica)
Zebra Dove (Geopelia striata)
Pink-necked Pigeon (Treron vernans)
Green Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula aenea) H
Mountain Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula badia)

PARROTS (PSITTACIFORMES: Psittacidae)
Blue-crowned Hanging-Parrot (Loriculus galgulus)

CUCKOOS (CUCULIFORMES: Cuculidae)
Moustached Hawk-Cuckoo (Cuculus vagans)
Malaysian Hawk-Cuckoo (Cuculus fugax)
Banded Bay Cuckoo (Cacomantis sonneratii) H
Plaintive Cuckoo (Cacomantis merulinus)
Brush Cuckoo (Cacomantis variolosus) H
Little Bronze-Cuckoo (Chrysococcyx minutillus) H
Violet Cuckoo (Chrysococcyx xanthorhynchus)
Asian Drongo-Cuckoo (Surniculus lugubris)
Black-bellied Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus diardi)
Raffles's Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus chlorophaeus)
Chestnut-breasted Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus curvirostris)
Greater Coucal (Centropus sinensis)

OWLS (STRIGIFORMES: Strigidae)
Buffy Fish-Owl (Ketupa ketupu)

NIGHTJARS and ALLIES (CAPRIMULGIFORMES: Caprimulgidae)
Javan Frogmouth (Batrachostomus javensis)

SWIFTS (APODIFORMES: Apodidae)
Glossy Swiftlet (Collocalia esculenta)
Cave Swiftlet (Collocalia linchi)
Silver-rumped Needletail (Rhaphidura leucopygialis)
Asian Palm Swift (Cypsiurus balasiensis)
House Swift (Apus nipalensis)

TREESWIFTS (APODIFORMES: Hemiprocnidae)
Gray-rumped Treeswift (Hemiprocne longipennis)
Whiskered Treeswift (Hemiprocne comata)

TROGONS (TROGONIFORMES: Trogonidae)
Red-naped Trogon (Harpactes kasumba)
Diard's Trogon (Harpactes diardii)
Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii)

KINGFISHERS (CORACIIFORMES: Alcedinidae)
Blue-eared Kingfisher (Alcedo meninting)
Black-backed Kingfisher (Ceyx erithacus)
Banded Kingfisher (Lacedo pulchella)
Stork-billed Kingfisher (Pelargopsis capensis)
Collared Kingfisher (Todirhamphus chloris)

BEE-EATERS (CORACIIFORMES: Meropidae)
Red-bearded Bee-eater (Nyctyornis amictus)
Blue-throated Bee-eater (Merops viridis)

HORNBILLS (CORACIIFORMES: Bucerotidae)
Black Hornbill (Anthracoceros malayanus)
Rhinoceros Hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros)
Helmeted Hornbill (Buceros vigil)
Bushy-crested Hornbill (Anorrhinus galeritus)
White-crowned Hornbill (Aceros comatus)
Wreathed Hornbill (Aceros undulatus)

BARBETS (PICIFORMES: Capitonidae)
Gold-whiskered Barbet (Megalaima chrysopogon)
Red-throated Barbet (Megalaima mystacophanos) H
Mountain Barbet (Megalaima monticola)
Golden-naped Barbet (Megalaima pulcherrima)
Blue-eared Barbet (Megalaima australis) H
Brown Barbet (Calorhamphus fuliginosus)

WOODPECKERS (PICIFORMES: Picidae)
Rufous Piculet (Sasia abnormis)
Gray-capped Woodpecker (Dendrocopos canicapillus)
Banded Woodpecker (Picus mineaceus)
Crimson-winged Woodpecker (Picus puniceus) H
Checker-throated Woodpecker (Picus mentalis)
Olive-backed Woodpecker (Dinopium rafflesii) H
Maroon Woodpecker (Blythipicus rubiginosus)
Orange-backed Woodpecker (Reinwardtipicus validus)
Buff-rumped Woodpecker (Meiglyptes tristis)

BROADBILLS (PASSERIFORMES: Eurylaimidae)
Dusky Broadbill (Corydon sumatranus)
Black-and-red Broadbill (Cymbirhynchus macrorhynchos)
Banded Broadbill (Eurylaimus javanicus)
Black-and-yellow Broadbill (Eurylaimus ochromalus)

PITTAS (PASSERIFORMES: Pittidae)
Giant Pitta (Pitta caerulea) H
Blue-headed Pitta (Pitta baudii)
Garnet Pitta (Pitta ussheri)

SWALLOWS (PASSERIFORMES: Hirundinidae)
Pacific Swallow (Hirundo tahitica)

WAGTAILS and PIPITS (PASSERIFORMES: Motacillidae)
Oriental (Paddyfield) Pipit (Anthus rufulus)

CUCKOO-SHRIKES (PASSERIFORMES: Campephagidae)
Lesser Cuckoo-shrike (Coracina fimbriata)
Pied Triller (Lalage nigra)
Scarlet Minivet (Pericrocotus flammeus)
Gray-chinned Minivet (Pericrocotus solaris)
Black-winged Flycatcher-shrike (Hemipus hirundinaceus)

BULBULS (PASSERIFORMES: Pycnonotidae)
Straw-headed Bulbul (Pycnonotus zeylanicus)
Black-headed Bulbul (Pycnonotus atriceps)
Scaly-breasted Bulbul (Pycnonotus squamatus)
Gray-bellied Bulbul (Pycnonotus cyaniventris)
Yellow-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus goiavier)
Olive-winged Bulbul (Pycnonotus plumosus)
Red-eyed Bulbul (Pycnonotus brunneus)
Spectacled Bulbul (Pycnonotus erythropthalmos)
Ochraceous Bulbul (Alophoixus ochraceus)
Yellow-bellied Bulbul (Alophoixus phaeocephalus)
Hairy-backed Bulbul (Tricholestes criniger)
Buff-vented Bulbul (Iole olivacea)
Streaked Bulbul (Ixos malaccensis)

LEAFBIRDS (PASSERIFORMES: Chloropseidae)
Greater Green Leafbird (Chloropsis sonnerati)
Lesser Green Leafbird (Chloropsis cyanopogon)
Blue-winged Leafbird (Chloropsis cochinchinensis)

IORAS (PASSERIFORMES: Aegithinidae)
Green Iora (Aegithina viridissima)

THRUSHES (PASSERIFORMES: Turdidae)
Bornean Whistling-Thrush (Myophonus borneensis)
Orange-headed Thrush (Zoothera citrina)
Everett's Thrush (Zoothera everetti)
White-browed Shortwing (Brachypteryx montana)

CISTICOLAS and ALLIES (PASSERIFORMES: Cisticolidae)
Yellow-bellied Prinia (Prinia flaviventris)

OLD WORLD WARBLERS (PASSERIFORMES: Sylviidae)
Bornean Stubtail (Urosphena whiteheadi)
Sunda Bush-Warbler (Cettia vulcania)
Mountain Tailorbird (Orthotomus cuculatus)
Dark-necked Tailorbird (Orthotomus atrogularis)
Rufous-tailed Tailorbird (Orthotomus sericeus)
Ashy Tailorbird (Orthotomus ruficeps)
Mountain (Leaf) Warbler (Phylloscopus trivirgatus)
Yellow-breasted Warbler (Seicercus montanis)

OLD WORLD FLYCATCHERS (PASSERIFORMES: Muscicapidae)
Eyebrowed Jungle-Flycatcher (Rhinomyias gularis)
Snowy-browed Flycatcher (Ficedula hyperythra)
Rufous-chested Flycatcher (Ficedula dumetoria)
Little Pied Flycatcher (Ficedula westermanni)
Indigo Flycatcher (Eumyias indigo)
Long-billed (Large-billed) Blue-Flycatcher (Cyornis caerulatus)
Malaysian Blue-Flycatcher (Cyornis turcosus)
Bornean Blue-Flycatcher (Cyornis superbus)
Gray-headed Canary-flycatcher (Culicicapa ceylonensis)
Oriental Magpie-Robin (Copsychus saularis)
White-rumped Shama (Copsychus malabaricus)
Rufous-tailed Shama (Trichixos pyrropyga)
Chestnut-naped Forktail (Enicurus ruficapillus)
White-crowned Forktail (Enicurus leschenaulti)

FANTAILS (PASSERIFORMES: Rhipiduridae)
White-throated Fantail (Rhipidura albicollis)
Pied Fantail (Rhipidura javanica)
Spotted Fantail (Rhipidura perlata)

MONARCH FLYCATCHERS (PASSERIFORMES: Monarchidae)
Black-naped Monarch (Hypothymis azurea)
Asian Paradise-Flycatcher (Terpsiphone paradisi)

WHISTLERS (PASSERIFORMES: Pachycephalidae)
Bornean Whistler (Pachycephala hypoxantha)

BABBLERS (PASSERIFORMES: Timaliidae)
Sunda Laughingthrush (Garrulax palliatus)
Black Laughingthrush (Garrulax lugubris)
Chestnut-capped Laughingthrush (Garrulax mitratus)
White-chested Babbler (Trichastoma rostratum)
Ferruginous Babbler (Trichastoma bicolor)
Short-tailed Babbler (Malacocincla malaccensis)
Black-capped Babbler (Pellorneum capistratum)
Sooty-capped Babbler (Malacopteron affine)
Rufous-crowned Babbler (Malacopteron magnum)
Chestnut-backed Scimitar-Babbler (Pomatorhinus montanus)
Bornean Wren-Babbler (Ptilocichla leucogrammica)

Striped Wren-Babbler (Kenopia striata)
Black-throated Wren-Babbler (Napothera atrigularis)
Mountain Wren-Babbler (Napothera crassa)
Gray-throated Babbler (Stachyris nigriceps)
Gray-headed Babbler (Stachyris poliocephala)
Chestnut-rumped Babbler (Stachyris maculata)
Chestnut-winged Babbler (Stachyris erythroptera)
Striped Tit-Babbler (Macronous gularis)
Fluffy-backed Tit-Babbler (Macronous ptilosus)
White-browed Shrike-Babbler (Pteruthius flaviscapis) H
Chestnut-crested Yuhina (Yuhina everetti)

NUTHATCHES (PASSERIFORMES: Sittidae)
Velvet-fronted Nuthatch (Sitta frontalis)

SUNBIRDS (PASSERIFORMES: Nectariniidae)
Ruby-cheeked Sunbird (Chalcoparia singalensis)
Plain Sunbird (Anthreptes simplex)
Purple-naped Sunbird (Hypogramma hypogrammicum)
Olive-backed Sunbird (Cinnyris jugularis)
Crimson Sunbird (Aethopyga siparaja)
Temminck's Sunbird (Aethopyga temminckii)
Spectacled Spiderhunter (Arachnothera flavigaster)
Little Spiderhunter (Arachnothera longirostra)

FLOWERPECKERS (PASSERIFORMES: Dicaeidae)
Yellow-breasted Flowerpecker (Prionochilus maculatus)
Yellow-rumped Flowerpecker (Prionochilus xanthopygius)
Orange-bellied Flowerpecker (Dicaeum trigonostigma)
Black-sided Flowerpecker (Dicaeum monticolum)

WHITE-EYES (PASSERIFORMES: Zosteropidae)
Black-capped White-eye (Zosterops atricapillus)
Mountain Black-eye (Chlorocharis emiliae)

ORIOLES (PASSERIFORMES: Oriolidae)
Dark-throated Oriole (Oriolus xanthonotus)
Black-and-crimson Oriole (Oriolus cruentus)

FAIRY-BLUEBIRDS (PASSERIFORMES: Irenidae)
Asian Fairy-bluebird (Irena puella)

HELMETSHRIKES and ALLIES (PASSERIFORMES: Prionopidae)
Large Woodshrike (Tephrodornis gularis)
Rufous-winged Philentoma (Philentoma pyrhopterum)
Maroon-breasted Philentoma (Philentoma velatum)

DRONGOS (PASSERIFORMES: Dicruridae)
Ashy Drongo (Dicrurus leucophaeus)
Bronzed Drongo (Dicrurus aeneus)
Hair-crested Drongo (Dicrurus hottentottus)
Greater Racket-tailed Drongo (Dicrurus paradiseus)

WOODSWALLOWS (PASSERIFORMES: Artamidae)
White-breasted Woodswallow (Artamus leucorynchus)

BRISTLEHEADS (PASSERIFORMES: Pityriaseidae)
Bornean Bristlehead (Pityriasis gymnocephala)

CROWS, JAYS and MAGPIES (PASSERIFORMES: Corvidae)
Crested Jay (Platylophus galericulatus)
Black Magpie (Platysmurus leucopterus)
Short-tailed Magpie (Cissa thalassina)
Bornean Treepie (Dendrocitta cinerascens)
Slender-billed Crow (Corvus enca)

STARLINGS (PASSERIFORMES: Sturnidae)
Asian Glossy Starling (Aplonis panayensis)
Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis)

WAXBILLS and ALLIES (PASSERIFORMES: Estrildidae)
Dusky Munia (Lonchura fuscans)
Chestnut Munia (Lonchura atricapilla)

OLD WORLD SPARROWS (PASSERIFORMES: Passeridae)
Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus)

BORNEO MAMMAL LIST

Taxonomy and nomenclature follow: Payne, Junaidi & Francis Charles, M. (1998) A Field Guide to the Mammals of Borneo. The Sabah Society, Sabah, Borneo.

Smooth-tailed Treeshrew (Dendrogale melanura)
(Malayan) Colugo or Flying Lemur (Cynocephalus varieagatus)
Slow Loris (Nycticebus coucang)
Maroon Langur or Red Leaf-Monkey (Presbytis rubicunda)
Proboscis Monkey (Nasalis larvatus)
Long-tailed or Crab-eating Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)
Pig-tailed Macaque (Macaca nemestrina)
Bornean Gibbon (Hylobates muelleri)
Orang-Utan (Pongo pygmaeus)
Giant Squirrel (Ratufa affinis)
Prevost'a Squirrel (Callosciurus prevostii)
Low's Squirrel (Sundasciurus lowi)
Jentink's Squirrel (Sundasciurus jentinki)
Bornean Mountain Ground Squirrel (Dremomys everetti)
Whitehead's Pygmy Squirrel (Exiliscriurus whiteheadi)
Red Giant Flying Squirrel (Petaurista petaurista)
Thomas's Flying Squirrel (Aeromys thomasi)
Yellow-throated Marten (Martes flavigula)
Oriental Small-clawed Otter (Aonyx cinerea)
Malay Civet or Tangalung (Viverra tangalunga)
Bearded Pig (Sus barbatus)
Lesser Mouse-Deer (Tragulus napu)
Sambar Deer (Cervus unicolor)